A relationship can be one of the most rewarding, and fulfilling parts of your life but it requires hard work. A successful relationship demands a lot of time, patience, and selflessness. Most importantly, a successful relationship requires a team effort. If you’ve ever played organized sports you know how damaging one players bad decision can be; the same applies to relationships. If you want your relationship to succeed both parties have to work as a team, and there’s no “I” in team. Here are a few tips that will help you and your partner become the kind of team that strong family foundations are built on.

There’s no “I” in Team
We’ve all heard it a million times – there’s no “I” in team. If you want a successful relationship you have to think about your partner before you make decisions. Consider how your decisions may impact the long and short term goals you have created with your partner. Job changes, major purchases, resident relocations, and even friendships all impact your relationship and your partner. When you consider your partner and include them in your decision making it shows you are committed, and serious about building a strong foundation with them.

Set Goals as a Team
We all enter relationships with our own independent goals, and that’s perfectly healthy. It is also important that you talk with your partner and begin to set goals that the two of you can attain as a team. Setting a common goal accomplishes two very important things in a relationship:
1) Creates a bond – Working together toward a goal requires both parties to focus on the same end result creating a bond that will only strengthen as you accomplish each milestone.
2) Sets the framework for future decisions – You are more likely to discuss decisions with your partner if you are working toward a common goal. Setting common goals indicate you are fully vested in a future with your partner.

Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
Communication is to a relationship what water is to a plant, it’s needed for growth. There are three key points for good communication in a relationship:
1) What you say – Hurtful words result in long lasting damage. Many years later a spouse will remember the one time their partner insulted them during an argument.
2) How you say it – In a failing relationship the issue isn’t always a lack of communication, it’s poor communication. The way you speak to your partner will have a great impact on the way they receive what you’ve said. Successful sports teams have a mutual respect for each other and it shows in the way they communicate.
3) When you say it – Don’t wait until you’re angry to voice your discontent with your partner. If they’ve done something that hurt you have the conversation early on. If you wait until you’re in the middle of an argument to express yourself you are going to say something you’ll likely regret later.

Follow the Golden Rule
The Golden Rule simply says, “Do to others what you want them to do to you.” If you infuse this rule into your relationship it will be a game changer. Think about how you want to be loved, and respected then treat your partner that way. Always put yourself in the other person’s shoes; if it doesn’t feel good to you it won’t feel good to them.

In addition to the above tips, I want to stress the importance of making the right selection from the beginning. Championship winning teams don’t just draft players because the player wants to be on the team. Players are drafted because they have something to offer, and they fit the team dynamic. Likewise, you want to select a partner based on your current and future aspirations. Rushing into a relationship with someone because you are lonely is a recipe for disaster. Choose your partner strategically. Ask yourself some of the following questions: Does this person add significant value to my life? Do we have common individual life goals? Can we communicate effectively with each other? Are our lifestyles similar? Are we morally and intellectually compatible? If you start with those five simple questions it will help you identify if this person is a fit for you. Attempting to build a successful relationship with someone you were never compatible with will lead to frustration and heartbreak for all involved.

Finally, truly successful relationships are hard work but they are possibleA relationship can be one of the most rewarding, and fulfilling parts of your life but it requires hard work. A successful relationship demands a lot of time, patience, and selflessness. Most importantly, a successful relationship requires a team effort. If you’ve ever played organized sports you know how damaging one players bad decision can be; the same applies to relationships. If you want your relationship to succeed both parties have to work as a team, and there’s no “I” in team. Here are a few tips that will help you and your partner become the kind of team that strong family foundations are built on.

There’s no “I” in Team
We’ve all heard it a million times – there’s no “I” in team. If you want a successful relationship you have to think about your partner before you make decisions. Consider how your decisions may impact the long and short term goals you have created with your partner. Job changes, major purchases, resident relocations, and even friendships all impact your relationship and your partner. When you consider your partner and include them in your decision making it shows you are committed, and serious about building a strong foundation with them.

Set Goals as a Team
We all enter relationships with our own independent goals, and that’s perfectly healthy. It is also important that you talk with your partner and begin to set goals that the two of you can attain as a team. Setting a common goal accomplishes two very important things in a relationship:
1) Creates a bond – Working together toward a goal requires both parties to focus on the same end result creating a bond that will only strengthen as you accomplish each milestone.
2) Sets the framework for future decisions – You are more likely to discuss decisions with your partner if you are working toward a common goal. Setting common goals indicate you are fully vested in a future with your partner.

Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
Communication is to a relationship what water is to a plant, it’s needed for growth. There are three key points for good communication in a relationship:
1) What you say – Hurtful words result in long lasting damage. Many years later a spouse will remember the one time their partner insulted them during an argument.
2) How you say it – In a failing relationship the issue isn’t always a lack of communication, it’s poor communication. The way you speak to your partner will have a great impact on the way they receive what you’ve said. Successful sports teams have a mutual respect for each other and it shows in the way they communicate.
3) When you say it – Don’t wait until you’re angry to voice your discontent with your partner. If they’ve done something that hurt you have the conversation early on. If you wait until you’re in the middle of an argument to express yourself you are going to say something you’ll likely regret later.

Follow the Golden Rule
The Golden Rule simply says, “Do to others what you want them to do to you.” If you infuse this rule into your relationship it will be a game changer. Think about how you want to be loved, and respected then treat your partner that way. Always put yourself in the other person’s shoes; if it doesn’t feel good to you it won’t feel good to them.

In addition to the above tips, I want to stress the importance of making the right selection from the beginning. Championship winning teams don’t just draft players because the player wants to be on the team. Players are drafted because they have something to offer, and they fit the team dynamic. Likewise, you want to select a partner based on your current and future aspirations. Rushing into a relationship with someone because you are lonely is a recipe for disaster. Choose your partner strategically. Ask yourself some of the following questions: Does this person add significant value to my life? Do we have common individual life goals? Can we communicate effectively with each other? Are our lifestyles similar? Are we morally and intellectually compatible? If you start with those five simple questions it will help you identify if this person is a fit for you. Attempting to build a successful relationship with someone you were never compatible with will lead to frustration and heartbreak for all involved.

Finally, truly successful relationships are hard work but they are possible. Picking the right person from the beginning, and properly aligning with your partner on the important issues are a great start in the right direction. Picking the right person from the beginning, and properly aligning with your partner on the important issues are a great start in the right direction